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Laparoscopy

Click here to view an animated version of this procedure.

Definition

Laparoscopy is a type of surgery done through several small incisions in the abdomen. Small tools and a laparoscope with a tiny camera, are placed through the incisions to allow the surgeon to see inside the belly and perform surgical tasks. This type of surgery is popular, because it usually shortens recovery time. It also leaves small scars in most cases.

Laparoscopic Instruments Being Placed in the Abdomen
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Reasons for Procedure

Many types of surgery can now be done with a laparoscope. Some examples include:

It can also be done to help make a diagnosis.

Possible Complications

Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Damage to blood vessels or organs
  • Problems related to anesthesia
  • The need for open surgery rather than laparoscopic surgery

Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

What to Expect

Prior to Procedure

Depending on the reason for your surgery, your doctor may do the following:

In the days leading up to your procedure:

  • Depending on the type of surgery, you may need to take a laxative or use an enema.
  • Arrange for a ride home.
  • The night before, eat a light meal. Unless told otherwise by your doctor, do not eat or drink anything after midnight.

Talk to your doctor about the medications you are taking. Up to one week before the procedure, you may be asked to stop taking some medications.

Anesthesia

Most commonly, you will have general anesthesia. You will be asleep.

Description of the Procedure

After you are asleep and do not feel any pain, a needle will be inserted to inject carbon dioxide into your abdomen. The gas will make your abdomen expand. This will make it easier to see the organs. The laparoscope will then be inserted through a small hole that is cut in the skin. The laparoscope lights, magnifies, and projects an image onto a video screen. The area will then be inspected.

If necessary, several other incisions will be made in the abdomen. Tiny tools will be inserted to take biopsies or do surgery. The incisions will be closed with stitches or clips.

How Long Will It Take?

This varies greatly depending on the procedure

Will It Hurt?

Anesthesia will prevent pain during the procedure. You may have soreness for a couple of days during recovery. Ask your doctor about pain medication. You may also feel bloated or have pain in your shoulder from the gas. This can last up to three days.

Post-procedure Care

When you are home, follow your doctor's instructions, which may include:

  • Removing the dressing the morning after surgery.
  • Avoiding heavy lifting.
  • Not drinking carbonated beverages for two days.

Ask your doctor about when it is safe to shower, bathe, or soak in water. You should be able to go back to regular activities in about one week. If the procedure was done to help diagnose a condition, your doctor will suggest treatment options. Biopsy results may take up to a week to come back.

Call Your Doctor

After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occur:

  • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
  • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
  • Persistent nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medications you were given
  • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you were given
  • Headache, muscle aches, feeling faint or lightheaded
  • Difficulty urinating or having a bowel movement

If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

Revision Information

  • American College of Surgeons

    http://www.facs.org

  • Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons

    http://www.sages.org

  • Health Canada

    http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca

  • Women's Health Matters

    http://www.womenshealthmatters.ca

  • Diagnostic laparoscopy patient information from SAGES. Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons website. Available at: http://www.sages.org/publications/patient-information/patient-information-for-diagnostic-laparoscopy-from-sages/. Accessed July 23, 2013.

  • Laparoscopy. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website. Available at: http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq061.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20130723T1313462445. Published April 2013. Accessed July 23, 2013.

  • 6/2/2011 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Mills E, Eyawo O, Lockhart I, Kelly S, Wu P, Ebbert JO. Smoking cessation reduces postoperative complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2011;124(2):144-154.e8.